Archive for March, 2010

Ratings Enabled

30Mar10

Okay, I’ve been getting a little more traffic recently, despite the lack of comments! It seems like a good moment to think about how my first couple of months have gone. I started from scratch in early January, as it seemed like there was a ‘gap in the market’ for a blog aimed at teachers, […]

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You know how some INSET days feel like a total waste of time? You spend ages listening to managers droning statistics or have consultants tell you that you’ve been doing it wrong all this time. Well, last week there was a really good hour which made up for the rest of the day. The session […]

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The last in this sequence – but by no means the end of my bookshelf, from which many more are loaned (and usually returned, surprisingly) – is sadly no longer in print. At least, the listings I found are for old copies at extortionate prices. The Unnatural Nature of Science by Lewis Wolpert is not […]

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We’re through the easier books, really – at least, the ones that I’ve found to recommend to students who are younger or who struggle, but are still interested. I expect them to dip in and out, perhaps miss the trickier sections. If I want to push them a little more, then Bill Bryson’s A Brief […]

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I like comics. I liked them as a kid and I like them now, especially titles such as The Sandman, Transmetropolitan and Preacher. (NB – these last two not really suitable for kids or easily shocked adults.) And so I was pleased when I was given The Physics of Superheroes by a friend. I suspect […]

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How To Dunk A Doughnut is a great collection of the science in everyday life, written as a collection of chapters. Inspired in part by a light-hearted paper in Nature 397 (I think it’s the same one as is republished at First Science here), the book examines how science affects us every day in the most […]

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As a sixth form student, many years ago, I had a subscription to New Scientist. I probably shouldn’t admit that on the interweb. Still, I found it interesting, if slightly geeky, and not too hard to understand most of the time. I now find some of the articles a bit basic, although useful in lessons, […]

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