Archive for January, 2010

I have to confess, this is on my bedside table having just picked it up last week, rather than an established part of my reference library. Making Sense of Secondary Science has already been useful as a guide to research showing what students really think. Knowing what ideas and misconceptions they have really helps to […]

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 After some specifically KS3 ideas, here’s one that can take you a little further. I was given The Resourceful Physics Teacher (by Keith Gibbs, but not currently available from Amazon or the Book Depository) by my friend Marion. She’s also a physics teacher and assured me it would be useful and it has indeed become […]

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Continuing the theme from yesterday, a time saver. I picked up a BBC KS3 Bitesize book, Check and Test Science. Each page has a summary of an idea, such as ‘special cells’ or ‘selective breeding’, which uses key words and simple diagrams. The bottom third of each page has questions to test what a student […]

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  As teachers, it’s really easy to end up reinventing the wheel. At my school, like many others, we have mountains of schemes of work, resources and worksheets. Like many other schools, I suspect, finding the best resources to use for any given lesson, at any given time, can be a challenge. For my KS3 […]

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Instead of one longer post, this week I’m planning to post five times, but much shorter. Let’s see how it works out. I read all the time. What I read informs my teaching, from thrillers and other fiction to recent popular (and unpopular) science. However, there are some books I return to time and again […]

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The bad news is, an incredibly bad bit of ‘science’ has once more reared its ugly head. The good news is, the story in the Daily Telegraph here is a fantastic opportunity to teach our students an awful lot about science… Hilarious update – Cliff is now claiming we should all ignore it and be happy […]

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Revising Online

15Jan10

(Updated 1st May to fix broken link) I’m a big fan of paper and pen, I have to admit. I can’t read a non-fiction book without a pencil in my hand, ready to add notes in margins. Revision should, I feel, start by writing out some ideas, perhaps headings or main nodes of a concept map. […]

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